Viennese Posters. Art, Artists, Artwork

“Viennese Posters. Art, Artists, Artwork.1868–1938” is a publication offering a series of explorations of specific aspects in Austrian cultural history which are linked to the development of the poster and graphic design in general. The period in question – from 1868 to 1938 – encompasses 70 years in which the world experienced major political, economic, technical and social upheaval. The same epoch also saw the development of the basics of our modern media world.

This book contains research findings on the creative interaction between advertising, art and media, and thus provides details of cultural history which were previously little known or even entirely unknown.

Contents

Bernhard Denscher, Viennese Posters / Barbara Denscher, “Haselmayer’s Educated Birds”. A poster and its background / Barbara Denscher, “One of the most original expositions”: The Vienna Poster Exhibition in 1888 / Bernhard Denscher, Censored: Gustav Klimt / Bernhard Denscher, Women in early graphic design: Three perspectives / Bernhard Denscher, Avant-garde advertising for Vienna / Barbara Denscher, “Verliebte Plakate” – Posters in love / Bernhard Denscher, War posters and their influence on the visual culture of the political propaganda in the First Austrian Republic / René Grohnert, The great illusion: Theo Matejko’s poster for the magician Erik Jan Hanussen / Murray G. Hall, Julius Klinger and Verlagsbuchhandlung Moritz Perles in Vienna / Murray G. Hall, Hermann Kosel as book designer. His work for the publisher Fiba-Verlag, Vienna–Leipzig / Bernhard Denscher, A poster for Josephine Baker / Christian Maryška, The “Anschluss” of Austrian graphic design / Christian Maryška, Julius Klinger and the path to annihilation.

Bernhard Denscher (Ed.): Viennese Posters. Art, Artists, Artwork. 1868–1938. Texts by Barbara Denscher, Bernhard Denscher, René Grohnert, Murray G. Hall and Christian Maryška. Translations by Rosemary Bridger-Lippe. Aesculus Verlag, Wolkersdorf 2022. 172 Pages, 22×15.5 cm; Price: EUR 29; ISBN 978-3-200-08542-8.